Wordplay

A Haiku Master

If you follow my website, you will know that I find Haiku an interesting and surprisingly creative verse structure.
It would appear to be restrictive, but in fact encourages experimentation because it leaves the poet no option for the obvious!

In case you do not know the rules, here they are again:
Haiku poetry is a Japanese form with very strict rules.
Kate Ledin put them into verse:

          HAIKU HAIKU
A three-line poem
Seventeen syllables long -
Five, seven, then five.

Clever!

                             

                         

Here is a lovely little Haiku book, from someone else I admire.
He "lives and counts syllables in New York City," the book cover tells us.
I also have his "Haiku for Jews," which wonderfully captures the special, dry, philosophical nature of hebrew humour.
David Bader is a very clever man!

In this book he provides us with summaries of some of the world's best-known books.
I have chosen a few of my favourites.
You really should get your own copy!

1 PRIDE AND PREJUDICE  Jane Austen

Single white lass seeks
landed gent for marriage, whist.
No parsons, thank you.

        


2 BLEAK HOUSE Charles Dickens
Fog, gloom, men in wigs -
the Chancery Court blights all.
See where law school leads?

                           


3 ROBINSON CRUSOE Daniel Defoe
Alone for twelve years,
then a footprint in the sand.
Thank God! A servant!




4 GULLIVER'S TRAVELS Jonathan Swift
Thus I was first great,
then small, and much vexed to learn
that size DOES matter.

  


5 BRIDESHEAD REVISITED Evelyn Waugh
Gay Catholic toffs -
What else to expect from a
man named Evelyn?

            


6 FRANKENSTEIN Mary Shelley
A mad scientist
creates a ghastly Monster
who just wants a hug.

                  


7 DOCTOR FAUSTUS Christopher Marlowe
A scholar trades a
few fun years for endless Hell.
Maths was not his field.

                       


8 PARADISE LOST John Milton
O'er and o'er God warned.
"Eat not th'Apple!" Man did'st and
God ballistick went.

     


9 KAMA SUTRA Vatsayana
Advice for those in
a difficult position.
First, be flexible.

    


10 WALDEN, OR LIFE IN THE WOODS Henry David Thoreau
Morning: pond-gazing.
Afternoon: berry-picking.
What a hectic day.


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